The Waiting Room Directory

Health & Wellbeing at your finger-tips
What is the TWR Directory?

Developed for Birmingham and Solihull communities and professionals, The Waiting Room is the go to online directory for health and wellbeing. It engages citizens with sources of support directly and seamlessly. It is viewed as the first stage in support for 1000’s of Birmingham and Solihull citizens.

With an emphasis on protection and prevention, The Waiting Room is split into 24 Life Domain key areas and by clicking on a key area, will take the user through to a list of local and national websites and contact numbers (fully accessible) that can be accessed for the purposes of information and direct support.

The Developers

Created by Common Unity alongside associates from Forward For Life since 2016. TWR has been supported by Birmingham Public Health, Birmingham City Council and the Birmingham and Solihull CCG as well as the education sector, crimninal justice services and the West Midlands Fire Service.

Contact TWR

For more information email info@the-waitingroom.org

Why the X Generation

A middle aged man thing. Or is it that straight-forward?
Click image for article

We often hear the statement that suicide is most likely to be undertaken by men in their middle age. But what is it about middle aged men? Has it always been this age group? Is it gender related or does society have a hand in this?

Recent data supplied from the Office of National Statistics provides a historical understanding of suicide in respect to men, women and the so called “Generation X” phenomenon.

This article from our Company Director takes a personal look into this phenomenon in a bid to highlight the impact of society on our day to day life experience.

Read more


Author: Terry Rigby
Published September 2019

SCHEMA: 29/10/20 – Sorry Fully Booked

Course: SCHEMA: An Approach to Suicide Prevention
Training Type: Face To Face
Duration: 8 Hours
Date: 29th October 2020
Location: Birmingham. UK
Status: Fully booked
Background:

Death by suicide is devastating and far reaching across our communities. It takes 3 times more lives per year in the UK than lives lost in accidents on all our roads. The most recent data tells us that over 6000 people died in the UK by suicide in one year. That means that every day, 16 people take their own lives in the UK.

But we can have an impact on this devastating act through learning skills to support a person with suicidal thoughts to consider life as an achievable plan.


Course Description

SCHEMA is a one day suicide prevention course that supports professionals and community members in effectively helping people with suicidal thoughts.

This course has been being designed and developed by experienced facilitators and practitioners in the fields of suicide prevention, mental health and well-being.


Learning aims
  • To provide delegates with knowledge around suicide and the skills to support an individual who may be thinking of taking their own life.
  • Enable participants to learn how to develop a collaborative helping relationship focused on life options for the individual at risk.
  • To equip participants with practical tools and a framework for understanding the needs of a person at risk along with a Life Plan Model that features risk assessment and future life planning approaches.
  • Provide a safe environment for practice to build confidence and skills.

Learning aspirations for delegates
  • Spot the signals of possible suicidal ideation
  • Ask the right questions
  • Explore with empathy
  • Assess risk level and forward plan
  • Enable short term support and appropriate signposting
  • Learn the skills that could save a life

Book a place

Sorry but there are no more places available on this day.


Contact Us

To discuss our future training dates, what we can offer or to book a session for your organisation please get in touch

e. info@forwardforlife.org

t. 07585776800


About the facilitators:
Facilitators: Terry Rigby & Caron Thompson

Terry Rigby (Forward For Life) and Caron Thompson (Common Unity) are recognised Suicide Prevention Trainers with 50 years combined experience of working in the mental health, suicide prevention and wellbeing sector both in a strategic and operational capacity.

Since 2012, Terry and Caron have delivered suicide prevention training on behalf of Birmingham and Solihull NHS, Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council, Dudley Borough Council and Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Partnership Trust. Training has also been delivered across the UK to private sector and national charitable organisations including IBM, Crisis, GazProm, McDonalds, National Express and BetFred.

Since they began co-facilitating, over 3000 people have benefited from learning suicide prevention skills through Caron and Terry via a range of training programmes and events.


SCHEMA: 21/10/20 – Sorry Fully Booked

Course: SCHEMA: An Approach to Suicide Prevention
Training Type: Face To Face
Duration: 8 Hours
Date: 21st October 2020
Location: Birmingham. UK
Status: Fully booked
Background:

Death by suicide is devastating and far reaching across our communities. It takes 3 times more lives per year in the UK than lives lost in accidents on all our roads. The most recent data tells us that over 6000 people died in the UK by suicide in one year. That means that every day, 16 people take their own lives in the UK.

But we can have an impact on this devastating act through learning skills to support a person with suicidal thoughts to consider life as an achievable plan.


Course Description

SCHEMA is a one day suicide prevention course that supports professionals and community members in effectively helping people with suicidal thoughts.

This course has been being designed and developed by experienced facilitators and practitioners in the fields of suicide prevention, mental health and well-being.


Learning aims
  • To provide delegates with knowledge around suicide and the skills to support an individual who may be thinking of taking their own life.
  • Enable participants to learn how to develop a collaborative helping relationship focused on life options for the individual at risk.
  • To equip participants with practical tools and a framework for understanding the needs of a person at risk along with a Life Plan Model that features risk assessment and future life planning approaches.
  • Provide a safe environment for practice to build confidence and skills.

Learning aspirations for delegates
  • Spot the signals of possible suicidal ideation
  • Ask the right questions
  • Explore with empathy
  • Assess risk level and forward plan
  • Enable short term support and appropriate signposting
  • Learn the skills that could save a life

Book a place

Sorry but there are no more places available on this day.


Contact Us

To discuss our future training dates, what we can offer or to book a session for your organisation please get in touch

e. info@forwardforlife.org

t. 07585776800


About the facilitators:
Facilitators: Terry Rigby & Caron Thompson

Terry Rigby (Forward For Life) and Caron Thompson (Common Unity) are recognised Suicide Prevention Trainers with 50 years combined experience of working in the mental health, suicide prevention and wellbeing sector both in a strategic and operational capacity.

Since 2012, Terry and Caron have delivered suicide prevention training on behalf of Birmingham and Solihull NHS, Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council, Dudley Borough Council and Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Partnership Trust. Training has also been delivered across the UK to private sector and national charitable organisations including IBM, Crisis, GazProm, McDonalds, National Express and BetFred.

Since they began co-facilitating, over 3000 people have benefited from learning suicide prevention skills through Caron and Terry via a range of training programmes and events.


SCHEMA: 25/09/20 – Sorry Fully Booked

Course: SCHEMA: An Approach to Suicide Prevention
Training Type: Face To Face
Duration: 8 Hours
Date: 25th September 2020
Location: Birmingham. UK
Status: Fully booked
Background:

Death by suicide is devastating and far reaching across our communities. It takes 3 times more lives per year in the UK than lives lost in accidents on all our roads. The most recent data tells us that over 6000 people died in the UK by suicide in one year. That means that every day, 16 people take their own lives in the UK.

But we can have an impact on this devastating act through learning skills to support a person with suicidal thoughts to consider life as an achievable plan.


Course Description

SCHEMA is a one day suicide prevention course that supports professionals and community members in effectively helping people with suicidal thoughts.

This course has been being designed and developed by experienced facilitators and practitioners in the fields of suicide prevention, mental health and well-being.


Learning aims
  • To provide delegates with knowledge around suicide and the skills to support an individual who may be thinking of taking their own life.
  • Enable participants to learn how to develop a collaborative helping relationship focused on life options for the individual at risk.
  • To equip participants with practical tools and a framework for understanding the needs of a person at risk along with a Life Plan Model that features risk assessment and future life planning approaches.
  • Provide a safe environment for practice to build confidence and skills.

Learning aspirations for delegates
  • Spot the signals of possible suicidal ideation
  • Ask the right questions
  • Explore with empathy
  • Assess risk level and forward plan
  • Enable short term support and appropriate signposting
  • Learn the skills that could save a life

Book a place

Sorry but there are no more places available on this day.


Contact Us

To discuss our future training dates, what we can offer or to book a session for your organisation please get in touch

e. info@forwardforlife.org

t. 07585776800


About the facilitators:
Facilitators: Terry Rigby & Caron Thompson

Terry Rigby (Forward For Life) and Caron Thompson (Common Unity) are recognised Suicide Prevention Trainers with 50 years combined experience of working in the mental health, suicide prevention and wellbeing sector both in a strategic and operational capacity.

Since 2012, Terry and Caron have delivered suicide prevention training on behalf of Birmingham and Solihull NHS, Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council, Dudley Borough Council and Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Partnership Trust. Training has also been delivered across the UK to private sector and national charitable organisations including IBM, Crisis, GazProm, McDonalds, National Express and BetFred.

Since they began co-facilitating, over 3000 people have benefited from learning suicide prevention skills through Caron and Terry via a range of training programmes and events.


International Men’s Day – Debate Pack 2016

Released through the House of Commons Library November 2016

What is International Men’s Day?

International Men’s Day (IMD) is an annual international event celebrated in over 80 countries including the UK on 19 November.

It was inaugurated in 1999 in Trinidad and Tobago and has backing from UNESCO.
The UK theme for the Day in 2016 was “Making A Difference for Men and Boys”.

The theme was designed to help more people consider what action we can all take to “Make A Difference” by addressing some of the issues that affect Men and Boys such as:

  • The high male suicide rate
  • The challenges faced by boys and men at all stages of education including attainment
  • Men’s health, shorter life expectancy and workplace deaths
  • The challenges faced by the most marginalised men and boys in society (for instance, homeless men, boys in care and the high rate of male deaths in custody)
  • Male victims of violence, including sexual violence
  • The challenges faced by men as parents, particularly new fathers and separated fathers
  • Male victims and survivors of sexual abuse, rape, sexual exploitation, domestic abuse, forced marriage, honour-based crime, stalking and slavery
  • The negative portrayal of men, boys and fathers

Our view at Forward For Life – Click on the image below

Local Suicide Prevention Planning in England

Publication: Samaritans (2019).

With around 4,500 lives lost to suicide every year in England (ONS 2018), preventing suicide is a challenging public health issue.

Everyday, on average, 12 people take their own lives. Meaning that everyday, scores of people have lost partners, family members, friends and work colleagues.

This report, published by Samaritans (2019), provided the first ever nationwide view of the breadth and depth of suicide prevention planning within and across local authorities in England.

Local action

There is much activity happening nationally to help prevent suicide. But, local action is critical to save lives. The most effective way to do this is through ensuring strong multi agency groups and excellent local public health leadership. This approach would ensure robust suicide prevention plans are in place that are being delivered effectively.

Signs of hope

Overall, an encouraging picture emerges from this report. Almost all local authority areas have established an action plan and multi-agency suicide prevention group.

There is a clear commitment to collaborative working at local level, made possible by strong leadership from Public Health teams and other local agencies, and there are a wide range of actions being delivered.

This work is taking place in the context of cuts to local public health budgets and cuts to provision fundamental to good suicide prevention, such as substance misuse services, and wider community services.

How to prepare and respond to suicide in schools

Publication: Help when we needed it most. Samaritans (2013)

Although a school can be affected by many challenging incidents, including sickness and accidental death, it is suicide that presents the unique risk of potentially being the trigger for another suicide.

Strategies for school-based prevention, intervention and postvention of suicidal behaviour are needed. This is because young people spend a considerable amount of their time at school. Suicide prevention demands a multi-sector approach. It can be an important issue not only within the health sector, but in non-health sectors such as the educational sector as well.


The key to coping with a crisis is to plan. It is particularly important that the school responds to a suicide within 48 hours.

This is necessary to maintain the structure and order of the school routine, while facilitating the expression of grief, and reducing the risk of imitative suicide.

Schools with crisis plans in place are best equipped to deal with a suicide when it happens. Good planning for the aftermath of suicide makes it easier for people to respond effectively at a time when resilience may be low.

A postvention protocol is an agreed approach to responding to a suicide.

  • In a school setting, this protocol should ideally:
  • be a written protocol, developed in advance of a suicide;
  • include working with the local community;
  • involve the formation and training of a postvention team – be clear about who will do what;
  • include procedures for notifying staff, parents and young people about a suicide;
  • include guidelines on how to inform the school community and handle the media;
  • identify appropriate postvention services and facilities;
  • include procedures for recognising ‘at risk’ individuals (including staff) and identifying where people would be referred;
  • include an evaluation of the effectiveness of the postvention and any follow-up protocol.
  • It is good practice that the whole school community would be aware of essential
  • information included in such planning, including who to tell, what to say and what not to say, and who is vulnerable.

Help is at hand – Support for those bereaved by suicide

Publication: Help is at hand. Support after someone may have died by suicide

When you first learn that someone has died in circumstances that may
be due to suicide, you can experience a range of emotions. You could be
feeling at a loss, and unsure about what you are thinking or doing.

People who have been bereaved by suicide have used their experiences to lead the revision of a support guide to help others affected by someone taking their own life.

Help is at Hand provides people affected by suicide with both emotional and practical support. Those bereaved by a suicide are at increased risk of mental health and emotional problems and may be at higher risk of suicide themselves, so receiving the right support is essential.

The guide is designed to be given out by bereavement support organisations and by those who are likely to be first on the scene after a suspected suicide.

Published 24 September 2015

Public Health England and The National Suicide Prevention Alliance

Does suicide always indicate a mental illness?

Editorial Piece: Abdi Sanati 2009

It is often assumed that suicide is almost always directly linked with poor mental health, and even more so, with a diagnosed mental health problem.

This editorial piece asks us to reconsider this almost taken for granted cause and effect assumption regarding suicide and underlying mental health challenges.

Each year, over 6000 people take their own lives in the UK. There has always been pressure on mental health services to improve risk assessment in order to reduce the suicide rate.

Back in 1992 The Health of the Nation aimed to reduce the suicide rate by 15% and by 1999 The Department of Health National Service Framework sought to cut the suicide risk by a further fifth from this target.

This implies that suicide is mainly seen as a medical or psychiatric issue – a mental illness.

Source details:

Author: Abdi Sanati

Specialist Registrar in Addiction Psychiatry, South West London & St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust,
London, UK

Published in the London Journal of Primary Care 2009; 2:93-4